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The Washington Commanders are a professional American football team based in the Washington metropolitan area. The Commanders compete in the National Football League (NFL) as a member club of the league's National Football Conference (NFC) East division. The team plays its home games at FedExField in Landover, Maryland; its headquarters and training facility are in Ashburn, Virginia. The team has played more than 1,000 games and is one of only five in the NFL with more than 600 total wins. Washington was among the first NFL franchises with a fight song, "Hail to the Commanders", which is played by their marching band after every touchdown scored by the team at home. The franchise was valued by Sportico in 2022 at roughly US$4.78 billion, making it the league's eight-most valuable team.[1] read more
The Washington Commanders are a professional American football team based in the Washington metropolitan area. The Commanders compete in the National Football League (NFL) as a member club of the league's National Football Conference (NFC) East division. The team plays its home games at FedExField in Landover, Maryland; its headquarters and training facility are in Ashburn, Virginia. The team has played more than 1,000 games and is one of only five in the NFL with more than 600 total wins. Washington was among the first NFL franchises with a fight song, "Hail to the Commanders", which is played by their marching band after every touchdown scored by the team at home. The franchise was valued by Sportico in 2022 at roughly US$4.78 billion, making it the league's eight-most valuable team.[1] read more
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Deal

Inova Health System sponsors Washington Commanders Twenty-four years after they moved into their current Loudoun County home — long known as Redskins Park — the Washington Redskins have reached a 10-year deal to re-name that facility the Inova Sports Performance Center at Redskins Park. The team’s first practice-complex naming-rights deal, which will be formally announced on Monday, is part of a strategic partnership with Inova that will include web content, radio and TV shows and community and wellness programs. The team also recently announced that Robin West — the medical director of Inova Sports Medicine — had become its new medical director. A team official described that move as “separate but related” to this week’s announcement. Terms of the partnership will not be announced. The Redskins and Inova — a healthcare system based in Northern Virginia — began discussing a formal partnership in early 2014, according to Terry Bateman, the team’s executive vice president and chief marketing officer. That process ultimately led to a comprehensive deal that will include a 30-minute weekly sports medicine talk show on SportsTalk 570 (which is controlled by team owner Dan Snyder), the “Inova Sports Medicine-Redskins Medical Minute” on ESPN 980 (another Snyder property), Inova’s involvement with the team’s annual Redskins Health & Wellness TV special on NBC 4 (which is also a team partner), and an Inova-sponsored “Find the Doctor” program aimed at Redskins fans. The press release announcing the deal will also mention a Redskins-Inova partnership on concussion base-line testing for elementary, high school and college athletes, and on breast-cancer awareness programs. Still, the most immediately obvious change will be in the facility’s name. “Redskins Park doesn’t go away; we just add a great partner,” Bateman said in an interview. “I think this is a truly a win-win-win. It’s a big win for Inova, it’s a big win for the Redskins and it’s a big win for the community.” The Redskins broke ground on the original Redskins Park, a seven-acre facility in western Fairfax County, in 1971. As the dimensions of pro football mushroomed, the team eventually outgrew that site, moving into a Loudoun County facility that was three times larger in the summer of 1992. That Ashburn site — where the team headquarters remains — was once known as “the new Redskins Park,” before eventually losing the qualifier. The new deal will soon lead to new signage on the front of the team’s practice bubble and on the entrance to its facility, and possibly to signage near its Loudoun County Parkway entrance. The team’s letterhead already refers to the “Inova Sports Performance Center at Redskins Park,” and the online, radio and social-media elements of the partnership will begin in the fall. While the Redskins have often been at the forefront of NFL marketing trends, other teams have sold practice facility naming rights for years. Many of these deals have involved medical companies: the Steelers train at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Rooney Sports Complex, the Jets at the Atlantic Health Jets Training Center, the Broncos at the UCHealth Training Center and the Dolphins at the Baptist Health Training Facility at Nova Southeastern University. Bateman said this deal made sense because of the synergy between a football team’s training facility and its medical operations, as well as the Redskins focus on health and wellness community work. West’s hiring, he said, emerged from the months of conversations between the two organizations, while this broader partnership was negotiated on a separate track. “The idea that we could pool our resources and come together and create a much more powerful health and wellness platform that can benefit our fans and our entire community just makes perfect sense,” he said. “Our vision, our resources, everything just matched up. And I think both parties feel really good that this is just the right fit.” 07/2016

Deal

Hoffman Meats sponsors Washington Commanders As part of their continued effort to improve the game-day experience at FedEx Field based on fan feedback, the Washington Redskins will introduce several new food and craft beer options at the stadium this season for a second consecutive year. On Wednesday, the team hosted a tasting of the expanded 2016 concessions menu for members of the media and several hundred season ticket holders who participated in a fan forum in April. Among the new food items sampled: red velvet chicken and waffles (a nod to the Redskins’ burgundy and gold color scheme), a bacon cheddar sausage on a mac ‘n’ cheese waffle, a pulled chicken sandwich topped with jerk barbecue sauce, loaded mac ‘n’ cheese bowls, three different hot soups, a buffalo chicken sausage and General Tso’s chicken served over white rice. “People wanted more variety,” Chris Bloyer, the Redskins senior vice president of operations and guest experience, said of the fan feedback that helped guide the changes to the FedEx Field menu. “They said, ‘There are too many places to get the same thing, so give us more variety.'” [Bruce Allen says Redskins fans were much happier with game-day experience in 2015] “I want more than Johnny Rockets,” longtime season ticket holder Rob Lee said while sampling the new fare. “I know the boss owns Johnny Rockets, but Johnny Rockets is just so-so and they could do so much better. Other stadiums that I’ve been to, including [the Ravens’] stadium, they have quite a few choices and it’s about delighting your customers.” (Redskins owner Daniel Snyder sold his stake in the oldies-themed burger chain in 2013, but Johnny Rockets can still be found in five locations at the stadium in 2016.) Lee, who noted that the new parking plan the Redskins unveiled last season in response to similar fan feedback “made a real difference,” enjoyed most of the food he sampled Wednesday. Fans and media members voted on four flavors of hot dogs from Hagerstown-based Hoffman’s Meats to decide the Redskins’ signature “Hog Dog,” which will be available on all three levels. The winning entry, announced toward the end of the event, includes bacon, ham, sausage and pulled pork. The soup cart, located in Sections 130 and 301, will open when the weather gets cold and offer Maryland crab, chicken noodle and garden vegetable varieties. Some of the “returning favorites” at Wednesday’s tasting included a grilled chicken sandwich, a crab cake sandwich, a BBQ beef brisket and bacon burger. Healthier fare — including a kale salad, a gluten free veggie wrap, and a variety of snack packs and fruit cups — will be available at the Caesar’s Vineyard stand in Sections 123 and 340. After adding a craft beer cart on the main concourse last year, Bloyer said the Redskins are making a “much bigger push” with craft beer this season. The tasting was held in a rebranded space on the club level called the Craft Haus, which will feature 8-10 rotating taps throughout the season. Elysian’s Space Dust IPA, Devils Backbone’s Vienna Lager, Flying Dog’s The Truth Imperial IPA, Bell’s Two Hearted Ale and Escutcheon Brewing Co.’s 4th and 1 Pilsner (John Riggins’s beer) were among the beers available Wednesday. “We’re trying to get some more local crafts, trying to get some variety and make it interesting,” Bloyer said. “There will be noticeably more craft beer on all three levels. This year we will probably triple the number of locations where you can find craft beer and it will not be the same all year. We will switch out the variety with the seasons and with the feedback we get during the season.” “I really hope this quality carries over,” Chris Corbin, another satisfied season ticket holder, said. “When you do it on a much smaller scale, you can only hope that it translates to a larger scale, but some of the food that we’ve tasted tonight, I’d certainly pay for it at a restaurant.” What Redskins fans can expect to pay for all this new food and beer at FedEx Field hasn’t been announced. “The thing that’s going to guide everything is the price, because it could be absolutely delicious, but if they’re charging $17.50, I could do without soup,” said Pat Shoemaker, who has had season tickets since 1997. Wednesday’s event also featured a sampling of some of the new food offerings for FedEx Field suite owners in 2016: 07/2016

Deal

USAA sponsors Washington Commanders Colonel, Retired Barney Barnum, U.S. Marine CorpsBarney Barnum served multiple tours as an artilleryman with both the 3rd and 2nd Marine Divisions to include two tours in Vietnam; Guard Officer at Marine Barracks, Pearl Harbor and Operations Officer, and four years at Marine Corps Recruit Depot, to name a few. In 1962 he was commissioned a second lieutenant in the U. S. Marine Corps. Barnum was the fourth Marine to be awarded the nation's highest honor, the Medal of Honor for valor in Vietnam, just one of his many medals and decorations. In August of 1989, Barnum retired from the Marine Corps.On July 23, 2001, he was sworn in as the Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Reserve Affairs In this capacity he was responsible for all matters regarding the Navy and Marine Corps Reserve including manpower, equipment, policy and budgeting.  Mr. Barnum was designated Acting Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Manpower and Reserve Affairs) on January 20 2009 and retired on April 30 2009.Master-at-Arms 3rd Class Quentin Benjamin, U.S. NavyMaster- at- Arms 3rd Class Quentin Benjamin hails from of Goose Creek, S.C.  He enlisted in the Navy in 2009 and is currently serving his first enlistment as well as his first assignment, Naval Support Activity Washington. MA3 Benjamin has been assigned to Naval Support Activity Washington as a Master- at- Arms for the past two years. MA3 Benjamin was nominated to be recognized by the Redskins because he was recently awarded the Navy's second-highest noncombat medal for his heroic actions. The Vice Chief of Naval Operations (VCNO) Adm. Jonathan Greenert recently awarded Master-at-Arms 3rd Class Quentin Benjamin, the Navy and Marine Corps Medal for heroism.Sergeant First Class Charles Byerly,  U.S. ArmyCharles Byerly, U.S. Army Sergeant First Class, returned to active duty after spending two years at Walter Reed Army Medical Center.  Charles worked at the Warrior Transition Battalion as a Platoon Sergeant. Although going through difficult times as a Wounded Warrior, Charles’s recovery from his injury is truly amazing!Staff Sergeant Hector Campos, U.S. ArmyHector Campos, Staff Sergeant, has been in the Warrior Transition Unit for about a year.  Prior to becoming a Wounded Warrior, Hector served in Iraq as a truck commander.  SSG Campos was involved in a severe military ambush and protected his unit despite enduring a severe injury.  He has complied with all of his treatment plans, which has helped him transition into the miraculous Soldier that he has become.  SSG Campos now has the desire to become a Squad Leader for the Warrior Transition Unit so that he may be able to give back to other Wounded Warriors.Major Justin Constantine, U.S. Marine Corp ReserveJustin Constantine joined the Marine Corps after his second year of law school in 2006.  He volunteered his service and served in the Al-Anbar Province as a Team Leader of a group of Marines performing civil affairs while attached to an infantry battalion.  Justin survived a sniper attack and continues to live his life to the fullest.  Justin had been awarded the Purple Heart, Combat Action Ribbon, Navy-Marine Corps Commendation Medal and most recently the “Champion of Change” for veterans, issued by the White House. He is currently a lawyer for the U.S. Department of Justice and sits on the board for several non-profit organizations.  Justin also founded IraqandBack.com and AfghanistanandBack.com, two organizations who raise money for others experiencing what Justin has experienced twice in his time with the military.Specialist Frederick Dickens, U.S. ArmyFrederick Dickens, U.S. Air Force Specialist, joined the Military in March of 2001.  He attended Basic training at Lackland Air Force Base and Advanced Individual Training at Sheppard Air Force Base to become an F-16 Crew Chief and Mechanic.  After transferring to the DC National Guard, he was deployed to Afghanistan in January of 2010 until his injury in October of 2010.  SPC Dickens has been transitioning from his injuries professionally, mentally and physically.  He has been a motivator for those around him, and is continuing his education to return to duty with the National Guard.Master Sergeant William Dixon, U.S. MarinesWilliam J. Dixon enlisted in the US Marine Corps in 1989.  Master Sergeant Dixon served combat tours during Operation Desert Shield, Desert Storm and Iraqi Freedom.  Deploying to over 30 countries, Dixon’s duties have ranged from Inspector Instructor Staff to Motor Transport Operations Chief. Currently, Sergeant Dixon is assigned to Marine Corps Funeral Director supporting Presidential, Congressional and all Marine Corps funerals and burials in Arlington Cemetery.  Dixon received the honor of 2008 Marine of the Year.  Sergeant Dixon is known for his pristine public speaking during ceremonies and his comforting counseling for the families of the fallen.Master Sergeant, Retired Curtis Dunn, U.S. ArmyCurtis Dunn went through the Q Course in 1989 and became a Green Beret.  Since enlisting in the Army, Curtis served on Active Duty, in the Reserves, and for the Army National Guard and retired after a successful 26-year career.  Throughout his career, Curtis has been deployed to 18 different countries for combat and non-combat related duties.  Dunn was awarded the Purple Heart during Operation Iraqi Freedom in 2007; He endured severe injuries during an improvised explosive device incident.  Currently working in the Naval Surface Warfare Center, Curtis goes out of his way to help fellow soldiers in any way he can!Sergeant First Class Lisa Ryan, U.S. ArmyLisa Ryan, a Sergeant First Class of the US Army, is currently stationed at the DC Armory, where she serves as the Battalion S1, PSNCO for Headquarters, 372nd Military Police Battalion. Sergeant First Class, Lisa M. Ryan was born on the island of Oahu.  She is the youngest and the only girl in her family to proudly serve in the military. She joined the United States Army in 1995. She also has been awarded with an abundance of Federal and State awards and decorations.Captain Alvin Shell, U.S. ArmyAlvin Shell, a retired US Army captain, is known as a local hero.  He was injured while helping another soldier in Iraq.  When he returned 100% percent disabled, the Wounded Warrior Project helped him start a new career.  For the past five years, Alvin has been working for Homeland Security.  He is a happy father of three boys and currently resides in Fredericksburg, Virginia.Hospital Corpsman 3rd Class, Glenn Tunacao, U.S. NavyHospital Corpsman 3rd Class Glenn Tunacao enlisted in the United States Navy in January 2004. In 2010, he was deployed to Landstuhl Regional Medical Center in Germany, where he was assigned to the Orthopaedic Surgery Department and responsible for the care 9,700  wounded warriors. Petty Officer Tunacao was named the 2011 Sailor of the Year for both Lanstuhl Regional Medical Center and Hospital Camp Lejeune in North Carolina. He is also recipient of the Army Commendation and the Army and Navy Achievement medals for his outstanding service. He most recently he has been selected to advance to Petty Officer Second Class. 11/2014

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